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Elixir

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How To Instrument Your Elixir Application with AppSignal

Instrumentation is an essential part of monitoring and operating an application, especially for apps heavily used in production. Even in today's everchanging technology landscape, visibility and observability still challenge developers and system administrators. Metrics and logging are essential for monitoring and operating an application. Metrics measure an application's performance and system health, while logging records system health and application state.

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Debugging and Tracing in Erlang

In part one of this series, the debugging tools we used — Elixir's IO.inspect/2, IEx.pry, and dbg/2 — required us to insert changes into code directly. Outside the development environment, you probably won't (and shouldn't) have access to your code. Erlang has a few tools to debug code at runtime: :debugger, :dbg.tracer, and :observer. First, let's look at the:debugger, a graphical debugging tool. Let's get going!

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How to Cache Locally in Elixir with Nebulex

In an Elixir application, you might need to access certain data frequently, which can be costly. The access time involved in retrieving data at every step can cause high latency, or even make the application crash (due to an increased workload on the database). Caching is the best technique to store the most frequently accessed data and minimize database data retrieval, improving the overall performance of the application.

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Debugging in Elixir and Erlang: An Introduction

Welcome to part one of this two-part series on debugging in Elixir and Erlang. In this post, we'll use several different tools and techniques to debug Elixir code. First, we'll get to know the demo project I created to showcase certain tools: dist_messenger. It's an Elixir project of a distributed messaging system that can be used directly on IEx. It allows users in different nodes to send and receive messages to each other.

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Parser Combinators in Elixir: A Deeper Dive

In our last post, we wrote a basic parser for phone numbers using Elixir. It was a bit simplistic since it didn't really respect the format phone numbers are expected to have, but it was a great start. We'll now improve the parser to ensure we only accept phone numbers that fit the spec and make our return type an instance of structured data. Let's dive straight in!

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Parser Combinators in Elixir: Taming Semi-Structured Text

The need to manipulate strings comes up quite often, whether it's to validate user-provided values or transform text into structured data that can be used programmatically. Most often, we'll reach for regular expressions to accomplish this task, but sometimes there's a better solution to the problem: parser combinators. In this two-part article, we'll explore how they work. Before moving on, let's define what 'parsing' is: Source: Wikipedia.

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Phoenix LiveView 0.18: New Special HTML Attributes

Phoenix LiveView 0.18 just shipped, with lots of new goodies to make developing LiveView an even better experience. In this post, I'll take you through a lesser-known new feature - LiveView's new special HTML attributes - and show you how to write cleaner HTML with :if, :for, and :let. When we're done, you'll have an eloquent, ergonomic, and dynamic function component you can use to render a list anywhere in your LiveView app. Let's dive in!

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Faster XML Parsing with Elixir

The XML data format has been around since 1996. It was first envisioned as a lingua franca (bridging language) for data to be serialized and read into completely disparate systems (with different programming languages, operating systems, and even hardware). It has been wildly successful in that goal. In software, though, 26 years is like a lifetime — and in hardware, it's an eternity.